DEEP DIVE: Spring Trousers

The weekend long read.
Here in the UK we’re slowly warming up to summer. The winter woolies have been stuffed into storage and we're welcoming… the summer wardrobe! There are a few firm favourites for my summer wardrobe and these include the Cara Top and Worker Shorts but most importantly… the Spring Trousers. This isn’t to say that the Spring Trouser don’t work in winter, because they do; they’re fantastic in a corduroy or soft twill. But this cut really shines in summer and it’s one of the most versatile patterns in the range.
I first designed a pair similar to this about 5 years ago after spending a whole summer feeling uncomfortable in jeans but not warm enough for shorts. I wanted something similar to a simple linen trouser but with a few more tailoring details. I then revisited the pattern before releasing it and made some improvements to the design. I made the leg wider and full length, I increased the rise to make the waist sit higher and I added the front pleats.
The thing I love most about the Spring Trousers is the COMFORT. The semi-elasticated waistband makes a big dinner bloat totally unnoticeable and as someone who goes up and down half a size on a regular basis this is so accommodating. The waistband is quite wide which I find extra flattering as it hugs your waist rather than digging in. The shape around the hips is loose without being baggy, helped by the front pleats and the long rise. I’m always aiming to feel elegant and comfy in equal measures and this pattern really fits the bill.
When I designed these trousers it hadn’t occurred to me that they might work as shorts. But then I saw a lovely shorts hack by @the_swiss_sewing_machine and I was hooked. They looked so wonderful I immediately made a pair and they’re easily my most comfortable pair of shorts, even beating the workers… I’ve seen long shorts and shorter shorts and they’re all great.
Fabrics
Now on to fabrics. This is where the pattern shows of it’s versatility. There is literally an option for every occasion and I've so far made them in the following fabrics:
 
Linen
I originally designed this cut for linen so it's a great fabric choice.
 
Light weight denim
You could arguably make these trousers in any weight of denim, but the super light weight denim makes for a great summer pair.
 
Cotton poplin
The first shorts pair I made were in a cotton poplin and they worked really well.
 
Silk (silk satin & plain weave)
I've made 2 pairs in silk for wedding outfits. The extra volume works beautifully but there are 2 areas to be aware of with lighter fabrics:
1. I don't topstitch the front pleats on silk as I find it pulls a bit too much
2. I also fuse both waistbands and stitch the elastic through both layers instead of just the inside layer
 
Brushed twill
I made a pair using beautiful brushed twill from Merchant & Mills. They're quite heavy due to volume of fabric but they're very cosy and have an elegant and dramatic feel.
 
Corduroy
My corduroy pair are much worn in colder months although if you chose a lightweight cord or needlecord they would be wearable all year round.
 
Wool Suiting
I haven’t made a pair in wool suiting but I think it would work really well.
Features
 
Technically this style is about the same level to our Worker Trousers. It features a zip fly, front pockets with facings & french seams, pleats and a semi-elasticated waistband. It's essentially a classic trouser construction with a couple of extra details.
 
It's well worth sewing this trouser to a high quality. If you've taken either of our trouser workshops (the Daphne Trouser or Worker Trouser) you'll already have the skills to apply to this style.
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